Tyne Tunnels, North East England

UK & Ireland

One of the UK’s busiest river crossings, the Tyne Tunnels are protected by industry-leading fire panels and extinguishant control systems from Advanced. The first Tyne Tunnel was opened in 1967 and an ambitious project saw the addition of second tunnel in 2011, including an upgrade of infrastructure and safety systems, at a cost of £140 million. The tunnels now see over 14.5 million vehicle journeys every year and provide a vital economic and infrastructure link across the River Tyne.

TT2 Limited, the company that operates the tunnels, specified a fully integrated system for the entire complex, including the original 1967 tunnel. After detailed consultation with the client and the main contractor, MxPro 4 fire panels and ExGo extinguishing control panels from Advanced were choseb, delivering a high performance fire system solution in a challenging environment.

MxPro is Advanced’s flagship range of multiprotocol panels, offering customers a choice of two panel ranges, four detector protocols and a completely open installer network that enjoys free training and support. MxPro panels can be used in single loop, single panel format or easily configured into high speed, 200 panel networks covering huge areas. Advanced’s legendary ease of installation and configuration and wide peripheral range make it customisable to almost any application.

ExGo, Advanced’s ultra-dependable extinguishant release system, was configured and installed in key service buildings for both tunnels. The ExGo range has been developed specifically for sensitive and strategic assets such as server rooms, historic attractions and critical infrastructure assets where gas extinguishing is required. The main control panel can be supplemented by remote terminals and up to seven remote status indicators per panel. ExGo is fully compliant with relevant EN54 fire standards (Parts 2, 4 and 13) and EN12094-1 extinguishing standards.

 

Documentation

ExGo Brochure

Historic Sites Brochure

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